W6D1 RTTC

Assignment:

Respond to TWO (2)  of your colleagues’ postings that contain a perspective other than yours. 

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
W6D1 RTTC
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

NO PLAGIARISM 

2–3 paragraphs in length per Colleague 

APA CITING 

Week 6: Understanding Strengths and Weaknesses

Learning Objectives

Students will:

· Formulate description of competitors, summary of literature review (based on the Capstone Project)

· Articulate your vision for your lifetime development as a leader

· Synthesize general statements for Key Life Areas (first 3)

Assignment:

Respond

 

to two of your colleagues’ postings that contain a perspective other than yours. Your response will typically be 2–3 paragraphs in length, as a general expectation.

· Share an insight about what you learned from having read your colleagues’ postings and discuss how and why your colleague’s posting resonated with you professionally and personally. (Note: This may be a great opportunity to help you think about passions you share with your colleagues who could become part of your Walden network.)

· Offer an example from your experience or observation that validates what your colleague discussed.

· Offer specific suggestions that will help your colleague build upon his or her perceptions as a leader.

· Offer further assessment from having read your colleague’s post that could impact a leader’s effectiveness.

· Share how something your colleague discussed changed the way you consider your own leadership qualities.

· 4–5 paragraphs in length

· No Plagiarism

· Cite References

1st Colleague – Marvin Taylor

Top of Form

Chapter 6: Comprehensive Literature Review

Overview

In the course of conducting research for this project, I focused my efforts on the collection of material and information that analyzed the factors that make great military leaders successful. In reviewing this material, against the MMSL curriculum studied for the past 19 months, if became apparent that military leaders are not unique or do not possess differentiating qualities from leaders in the private sector or business world. Leadership is the art or process of influencing an individual or group to achieve a common goal (Northouse, 2016).  Whether your goal is advancing on a position during a critical battle or implementing a new manufacturing process that improves the quality of products to enhance customer satisfaction, inspiring and guiding people to achieve a common goal is the bedrock of leadership.

During this research process, I sought to answer the question: What common leadership factors are necessary for great military leaders in the 21st century? Over the course of my adult life, I have served with many great leaders as an active duty member of the U.S. Air Force and now, in my current role, as a Department of Defense Civilian employee. Many of these incredible men and women exuded the admirable qualities of leadership my classmates and I have studied during this incredible journey. At various times while serving under their guiding hands, I pondered the often-asked question, are these leaders made, or are they born with the inordinate ability to lead and inspire people to achieve great things. During my career and throughout this journey, I have concluded that leading is an individual choice made by willing people who accept the mantle of responsibility to serve their organization and the people who comprise it (DePree, 1989). These individuals fully understand and embrace the challenges before by them accepting the responsibility of leadership. No matter the difficulty or complexity of issues they face, these individuals display unequalled dedication to the betterment of others by their choice to accept the obligation of leading.

3

 

My focus for answering the question examined in chapter 4, has been to identify and evaluate the basic tenants of great military leaders that have broad applicability to service in the armed forces, regardless of rank or position. In the past, leadership in the military services followed an adherence to rank and positions of authority. When holding the position or rank, the leader’s guidance or direction was never to be questioned unless it violated a moral or legal standard. However, the armed forces, certainly my branch, have embarked on a slow transformation in leadership philosophy that accepts and welcomes the questioning of leadership to ensure the thorough examination of ideas and perspectives as well as the open display of commitment to the caring for and concern about the individual members (Black, 1998). The prototypical all-knowing and unquestioned military leader of earlier times has been slowly replaced with a transformational leader who builds dynamic teams through the utilization of the broad and diverse talents of those who encompass their organization. The application of transformational leadership is slowly inculcating the highest levels of military leadership and fundamentally changing how leaders motivate followers to accomplish a shared goal (United States Marine Corp, 2018). 

Servant Leadership

My research and literature review focused on the concept of servant leadership as the basic leadership philosophy necessary for great military leaders. Military leadership has historically been characterized by the perception of abusive commanders who mandated strict adherence to the role and power their position held (Cowper, 2000). However, after three decades of continuous engagement in the Middle East, a necessary leadership viewpoint is changing. Military leaders are now focusing on the most critical resource that comprises our institution, the people. A military leader’s job is to mentor, serve, and develop those under their charge to reach their fullest potential and prepare them for the many future leadership challenges they will inevitably face (Goldfein, 2001). Servant leadership is the backbone of a leadership philosophy where those in positions of authority care for and develop people to achieve all they are capable of. Today’s military is changing. It is not the top-down, centrally controlled monolith of yesteryear, but an organization, which realized that individual members are critical to its long-term viability as an entity (Cowper, 2000).

4

 

Building Teams to Lead Positive Change

The second area of research revolved around the critical aspect military leader’s face when building teams that lead positive change. By design, military leaders spend approximately two years in command positions then rotate out to allow for the advancement of other leaders. Non-command positions of influence spend three to four years in a position before leaving for other assignments. This short timeframe dictates that leader’s diagnosis potential problems quickly and build a guiding coalition to implement needed changes rapidly. This guiding coalition must exude the four characteristics necessary for enacting positive change. The right players must be on board, these players must have the expertise relevant to the task, they must be a credible group in the eyes of those impacted by the change(s), and they must have strong leadership (Kotter, 1996). Military leaders face a daunting task to build teams and implement course corrections in an expeditious manner. However, when military leaders exhibit genuine care and commitment for those in their care, the churn of constant change can be eased by knowing the leader has their best interest at heart.

5

 

Embracing Diversity

The third area of research dealt with the military leader’s attitude and embracing of the diverse and multicultural environment that makes up the armed forces. The military has long been a melting pot with members of various cultures and ethnicities. The strength of the institution comes from the opinions, ideas, and innovations brimming in the minds of its members. Military leaders cannot rely solely on their experience, perspective, and ideas, but must be open and willing to solicit differing opinions and thoughts to holistically examine a given issue to reach the best possible solution. According to the Commander of Air Mobility Command, “Airman must be bold and innovative, throw out the wild ideas that come from our diverse force, see what sticks and what takes hold” (Everhart, 2018, p. 18). Successful military leaders understand the strength of the organization does not come from their technical and tactical expertise alone, but in the collective power of the innovative minds that make up the institution.

Questioning to Solve Problems

The fourth literature review area focused on the leader’s use of questions to solve problems. Much literature espouses the need to and art of questioning to solve problems. The profession of arms has been slow to embrace the art of healthy debate and professional questioning. However, as the education and experience levels of today’s military members increases, leaders have come to the realization that asking questions and engaging in debate offers the best possible solutions to organizational challenges. Commanders and leaders must continually ask why to open the dialog that leads to exploring new and creative ways of accomplishing the critical tasks we carry out (Goldfein, 2001). The nature of innovation and creativity begins with challenging the status quo and asking why.

6

 

Creating and Espousing a Shared Vision

Finally, the last area of literature review focused on the critical aspect of creating and espousing a shared vision. In the past, military leaders gave orders and directed the actions of subordinates to accomplish the mission. Today, great leaders create a mental picture of what is possible in the minds of their followers that serves as a guide, which leads them towards accomplishment. The vision becomes a force in people’s hearts and minds that can lead to incredible achievement and collective power (Senge, 2006). Today’s military leaders provide the vision and set the environment; if you focus elsewhere, you are probably doing someone else’s job (Goldfein, 2001, p. 23). Given the short time in command of a particular unit, military leaders must make their vision easily understandable and relevant to every member of the organization. Without this inclusivity at the lowest levels, it is merely the commander’s vision, not a shared idea. Senior leaders in any organization, must continually reaffirm the present reality, but more importantly, continue to spread the overarching image of what is possible and where the institution is going in the future (Wilson, 2018).   

Once could make a case that any number of leadership qualities are necessary for successful military leaders. Literature is replete with ideas, thoughts, and concepts of leadership that, if applied correctly, would reasonably ensure success on the battlefield or in the corporate boardroom. However, in building the direction of this project and my examination of literature, the common factors of servant leadership, teambuilding, embracing diversity, questioning, and creating vision came to the forefront. Further research endeavors may delve into additional factors, which could reasonably ensure military leadership success. I am certain, many factors play a critical role in building todays leaders, the five specific traits I examined set the 21st century military leader on the path to success.                               

Bottom of Form

2nd Colleague – Natasha

Research Paper Track – Comprehensive Summary of Literature Review

Top of Form

My research study aims to investigate forms of support leaders can provide Gen Z in the workplace for the growth of Gen Z employees and for the realization of organizational goals. A wide range of literature shows that leaders are struggling to accommodate Gen Z and create a conducive work environment that fosters their growth. This is causing a high attrition rate among this cohort of employees (Jetha et al., 2021). With the inevitable mass entry of Gen Z into the workplace in the near future, it is critical to find strategies leaders can use for positive outcomes in working with Gen Z.

In studying this issue of the relationship between leaders and Gen Z, literature shows that organizations already understand various concepts about the cohort. This presents a strength for my research because the topic is not completely new. Simply put, there is knowledge to build on and create more impact by providing additional knowledge on the issue. For instance, plenty of literature outlining the characteristics of Gen Z exist, and it is from these characteristics that strategies for leaders to create a conducive environment for these employees can be developed. Gaidhani et al. (2019), alongside other researchers, provide lists of Gen Z characteristics and preferences in the workplace, which my research will rely on for its findings.

The existing literature on various components of understanding Gen Z in the workplace also acts as a weakness for my research. This is specifically in terms of sources to rely on to assess the validity of the recommendations I will provide after my study about the specific issue I will be researching. Leaders are facing a crisis concerning the effective leadership strategies for the newest employees. Gabrielova & Buchko (2021) state that Millennials form the greatest number of managers tasked with leading Gen Z in the workplace. As a result, there is generational conflict that calls for prompt strategies to address. For this reason, the support strategies proposed must have high levels of accuracy, which poses a weakness for my research because there are limited previous research studies for comparison.

At the same time, it provides opportunities since there is a research gap to be filled that promises organizational leaders better outcomes. Chillakuri (2020) mentions that inter-generational differences are a natural phenomenon that organizations have to embrace. Therefore, I have the opportunity to help leaders and organizations embrace the inter-generational differences between Gen Z and the previous generations in a more effective and productive way. In other words, the absence of enough literature providing leaders with recommendations on how to best lead Gen Z gives me the opportunity to create a profound impact on leadership effectiveness, which is a fundamental part of my life mission and vision.

When it comes to the threats stemming from the available literature on the issue my research project will be researching, it concerns the fact that this research may be one of the pioneer studies about how leaders can best support Gen Z in the workplace for their growth and organizational success. Gaidhani et al. (2019) state that organizations face difficulties hiring and retaining Gen Z without proper understanding of this generation. The same argument applies in the context of leading Gen Z. Without effective recommendations on how leaders can support Gen Z, they will likely impede sustainable growth for Gen Z, as well as their organizations. This failure will constantly be attributed to the recommendations of my study, a factor that increases the possibility of my research being less relevant in due time. This is a major threat to my ambition of positively affecting the concept of leadership.

In summary, existing body of literature about Gen Z in the workplace largely focuses on their characteristics, preferences, pending influx into the workplace, and challenges leaders are facing or are about to face in the near future as a result. Only a few studies, such as that by Goh & Okumus (2020) illuminate on strategies organizations may use to attract and retain Gen Z in the workplace. These aspects pose strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to my research study.

References

Chillakuri, B. (2020). Understanding Generation Z expectations for effective onboarding. Journal of Organizational Change Management.

Gabrielova, K., & Buchko, A. A. (2021). Here comes Generation Z: Millennials as managers. Business Horizons, 64(4), 489-499.

Gaidhani, S., Arora, L., & Sharma, B. K. (2019). Understanding the attitude of generation Z towards workplace. International Journal of Management, Technology and Engineering, 9(1), 2804-2812.

Goh, E., & Okumus, F. (2020). Avoiding the hospitality workforce bubble: Strategies to attract and retain generation Z talent in the hospitality workforce. Tourism Management Perspectives, 33, 100603.

Jetha, A., Shamaee, A., Bonaccio, S., Gignac, M. A., Tucker, L. B., Tompa, E., … & Smith, P. M. (2021). Fragmentation in the future of work: A horizon scan examining the impact of the changing nature of work on workers experiencing vulnerability. American journal of industrial medicine, 64(8), 649-666.

Bottom of Form

Chapter 6: Comprehensive Literature Review

Overview

In the course of conducting research for this project, I focused my efforts on the collection of material and information that analyzed the factors that make great military leaders successful. In reviewing this material, against the MMSL curriculum studied for the past 19 months, if became apparent that military leaders are not unique or do not possess differentiating qualities from leaders in the private sector or business world. Leadership is the art or process of influencing an individual or group to achieve a common goal (Northouse, 2016). Whether your goal is advancing on a position during a critical battle or implementing a new manufacturing process that improves the quality of products to enhance customer satisfaction, inspiring and guiding people to achieve a common goal is the bedrock of leadership.

During this research process, I sought to answer the question, what common leadership factors are necessary for great military leaders in the 21st century? Over the course of my adult life, I have served with many great leaders as an active duty member of the U.S. Air Force and now, in my current role, as a Department of Defense Civilian employee. Many of these incredible men and women exuded the admirable qualities of leadership my classmates and I have studied during this incredible journey. At various times while serving under their guiding hands, I pondered the often-asked question, are these leaders made, or are they born with the inordinate ability to lead and inspire people to achieve great things. During my career and throughout this journey, I have concluded that leading is an individual choice made by willing people who accept the mantle of responsibility to serve their organization and the people who comprise it (DePree, 1989). These individuals fully understand and embrace the challenges before by them accepting the responsibility of leadership. No matter the difficulty or complexity of issues they face, these individuals display unequalled dedication to the betterment of others by their choice to accept the obligation of leading.

My focus for answering the question examined in chapter 4, has been to identify and evaluate the basic tenants of great military leaders that have broad applicability to service in the armed forces, regardless of rank or position. In the past, leadership in the military services followed an adherence to rank and positions of authority. When holding the position or rank, the leader’s guidance or direction was never to be questioned unless it violated a moral or legal standard. However, the armed forces, certainly my branch, have embarked on a slow transformation in leadership philosophy that accepts and welcomes the questioning of leadership to ensure the thorough examination of ideas and perspectives as well as the open display of commitment to the caring for and concern about the individual members (Black, 1998). The prototypical all-knowing and unquestioned military leader of earlier times has been slowly replaced with a transformational leader who builds dynamic teams through the utilization of the broad and diverse talents of those who encompass their organization. The application of transformational leadership is slowly inculcating the highest levels of military leadership and fundamentally changing how leaders motivate followers to accomplish a shared goal (United States Marine Corp, 2018).

Servant Leadership

My research and literature review focused on the concept of servant leadership as the basic leadership philosophy necessary for great military leaders. Military leadership has historically been characterized by the perception of abusive commanders who mandated strict adherence to the role and power their position held (Cowper, 2000). However, after three decades of continuous engagement in the Middle East, a necessary leadership viewpoint is changing. Military leaders are now focusing on the most critical resource that comprises our institution, the people. A military leader’s job is to mentor, serve, and develop those under their charge to reach their fullest potential and prepare them for the many future leadership challenges they will inevitably face (Goldfein, 2001). Servant leadership is the backbone of a leadership philosophy where those in positions of authority care for and develop people to achieve all they are capable of. Today’s military is changing. It is not the top-down, centrally controlled monolith of yesteryear, but an organization, which realized that individual members are critical to its long-term viability as an entity (Cowper, 2000).

Building Teams to Lead Positive Change

The second area of research revolved around the critical aspect military leader’s face when building teams that lead positive change. By design, military leaders spend approximately two years in command positions then rotate out to allow for the advancement of other leaders. Non-command positions of influence spend three to four years in a position before leaving for other assignments. This short timeframe dictates that leader’s diagnosis potential problems quickly and build a guiding coalition to implement needed changes rapidly. This guiding coalition must exude the four characteristics necessary for enacting positive change. The right players must be on board, these players must have the expertise relevant to the task, they must be a credible group in the eyes of those impacted by the change(s), and they must have strong leadership (Kotter, 1996). Military leaders face a daunting task to build teams and implement course corrections in an expeditious manner. However, when military leaders exhibit genuine care and commitment for those in their care, the churn of constant change can be eased by knowing the leader has their best interest at heart.

Embracing Diversity

The third area of research dealt with the military leader’s attitude and embracing of the diverse and multicultural environment that makes up the armed forces. The military has long been a melting pot with members of various cultures and ethnicities. The strength of the institution comes from the opinions, ideas, and innovations brimming in the minds of its members. Military leaders cannot rely solely on their experience, perspective, and ideas, but must be open and willing to solicit differing opinions and thoughts to holistically examine a given issue to reach the best possible solution. According to the Commander of Air Mobility Command, “Airman must be bold and innovative, throw out the wild ideas that come from our diverse force, see what sticks and what takes hold” (Everhart, 2018, p. 18). Successful military leaders understand the strength of the organization does not come from their technical and tactical expertise alone, but in the collective power of the innovative minds that make up the institution.

Questioning to Solve Problems

The fourth literature review area focused on the leader’s use of questions to solve problems. Much literature espouses the need to and art of questioning to solve problems. The profession of arms has been slow to embrace the art of healthy debate and professional questioning. However, as the education and experience levels of today’s military members increases, leaders have come to the realization that asking questions and engaging in debate offers the best possible solutions to organizational challenges. Commanders and leaders must continually ask why to open the dialog that leads to exploring new and creative ways of accomplishing the critical tasks we carry out (Goldfein, 2001). The nature of innovation and creativity begins with challenging the status quo and asking why.

Creating and Espousing a Shared Vision

Finally, the last area of literature review focused on the critical aspect of creating and espousing a shared vision. In the past, military leaders gave orders and directed the actions of subordinates to accomplish the mission. Today, great leaders create a mental picture of what is possible in the minds of their followers that serves as a guide, which leads them towards accomplishment. The vision becomes a force in people’s hearts and minds that can lead to incredible achievement and collective power (Senge, 2006). Today’s military leaders provide the vision and set the environment; if you focus elsewhere, you are probably doing someone else’s job (Goldfein, 2001, p. 23). Given the short time in command of a particular unit, military leaders must make their vision easily understandable and relevant to every member of the organization. Without this inclusivity at the lowest levels, it is merely the commander’s vision, not a shared idea. Senior leaders in any organization, must continually reaffirm the present reality, but more importantly, continue to spread the overarching image of what is possible and where the institution is going in the future (Wilson, 2018).

Once could make a case that any number of leadership qualities are necessary for successful military leaders. Literature is replete with ideas, thoughts, and concepts of leadership that, if applied correctly, would reasonably ensure success on the battlefield or in the corporate boardroom. However, in building the direction of this project and my examination of literature, the common factors of servant leadership, teambuilding, embracing diversity, questioning, and creating vision came to the forefront. Further research endeavors may delve into additional factors, which could reasonably ensure military leadership success. I am certain, many factors play a critical role in building todays leaders, the five specific traits I examined set the 21st century military leader on the path to success.

3

4

5

6

Achiever Essays
Calculate your paper price
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Why Work with Us

Top Quality and Well-Researched Papers

We always make sure that writers follow all your instructions precisely. You can choose your academic level: high school, college/university or professional, and we will assign a writer who has a respective degree.

Professional and Experienced Academic Writers

We have a team of professional writers with experience in academic and business writing. Many are native speakers and able to perform any task for which you need help.

Free Unlimited Revisions

If you think we missed something, send your order for a free revision. You have 10 days to submit the order for review after you have received the final document. You can do this yourself after logging into your personal account or by contacting our support.

Prompt Delivery and 100% Money-Back-Guarantee

All papers are always delivered on time. In case we need more time to master your paper, we may contact you regarding the deadline extension. In case you cannot provide us with more time, a 100% refund is guaranteed.

Original & Confidential

We use several writing tools checks to ensure that all documents you receive are free from plagiarism. Our editors carefully review all quotations in the text. We also promise maximum confidentiality in all of our services.

24/7 Customer Support

Our support agents are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week and committed to providing you with the best customer experience. Get in touch whenever you need any assistance.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

No need to work on your paper at night. Sleep tight, we will cover your back. We offer all kinds of writing services.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

No matter what kind of academic paper you need and how urgent you need it, you are welcome to choose your academic level and the type of your paper at an affordable price. We take care of all your paper needs and give a 24/7 customer care support system.

Admissions

Admission Essays & Business Writing Help

An admission essay is an essay or other written statement by a candidate, often a potential student enrolling in a college, university, or graduate school. You can be rest assurred that through our service we will write the best admission essay for you.

Reviews

Editing Support

Our academic writers and editors make the necessary changes to your paper so that it is polished. We also format your document by correctly quoting the sources and creating reference lists in the formats APA, Harvard, MLA, Chicago / Turabian.

Reviews

Revision Support

If you think your paper could be improved, you can request a review. In this case, your paper will be checked by the writer or assigned to an editor. You can use this option as many times as you see fit. This is free because we want you to be completely satisfied with the service offered.

Live Chat+1(978) 822-0999EmailWhatsApp

Order your essay today and save 20% with the discount code RESEARCH